Guitar Scales are a way of organizing the notes on the fret board. As a beginner, it’s a good way to practice picking and fretting notes at different places on the neck. As you get more experienced, you will arrange notes from the scale to create melodies, licks, solos, etc. In this video lesson, Peter Vogl will teach you how to play open or first position versions of the Pentatonic, Blues, and Major Scales. Practice these scales until you feel comfortable playing them at a medium tempo.


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gibson-weight-relief-modernAs popular and iconic as they are, one of the complaints with Les Paul style guitars is that they are very heavy. If a lighter type of wood was used for the body, that would help with the weight, but of course it would also change the tone. To maintain as similar a tone as possible to its solid-body counterparts, some models are offering chambered bodies. This is where sections of the body under the maple top are routed out, creating “chambers.” In addition to reducing weight, these chambers are also suppose to increase resonance.

While I understand Gibson wanting to market their guitars to people who have weight issues, I can say that from my experience of owning a chambered Strat that there was a huge decrease in resonance. To me, it’s like having a hollow-bodied guitar, but the wood is too thick to really vibrate well.

In my opinion, if the problem is weight, there are lighter woods that can be used. The tone is part of the solid mahogany body. Creating chambers in an asymmetrical fashion in my opinion will not increase resonance while reducing mass.

What’s your opinion? Read more about different chamber types and see what some pros have to say on both sides of the issue at Gibson.com

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Every guitarist strives to have killer tone. Many guitarists are also huge gear heads and will spend hours at home tweaking our effects and amp settings until we dial in exactly what we want. The problem is that what we create at home doesn’t always translate to the stage. The simple reason is that we’re not playing at stage volume at home. The tone that we’re in search of is directly related to the volume at which we play.

Seymour-Duncan-Blog

Nick Beatty has written a blog over at SeymourDuncan.com where he goes into detail about why low volume settings don’t translate to the stage. I highly recommend reading this. A little science make make your tone killer!

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Once you learn the basics of playing guitar, it’s time to branch out and start learning songs. The quick and easy way of teaching you how to play a guitar part is called tablature or tab. This shorthand was created to let you know which strings, frets, and even fingers you should be using. You may encounter different looking tab on various sites, but the basic principles remain the same. In this video lesson, Peter will teach you the basics of Reading Guitar Tab.

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Two of the most essential guitar techniques for a beginner to learn are hammer-ons and pull-offs. The concept is essentially using your left hand fingers to create notes instead of your right hand with a pick or plucking. The resulting sound adds variety and sometimes speed to your playing. In this video lesson, Matthias will walk you through the basics of playing both hammer-ons and pull-offs as well as trills which are a combination of the two techniques. After learning the concepts, Matthias will teach you a couple of guitar licks that use these techniques. If you practice these regularly and use the proper form, hammer-ons and pull-offs should become much easier to play.


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